(5) ‘Pain management clinic’means a clinic licensed pursuant to Article 10 of Chapter 34 of Title 43. Notwithstanding other laws, the “purchase, acquisition, possession or use of an opioid antagonist pursuant to this section shall not constitute the unlawful practice of a profession or other violation under title eight of the education law or this article.”, “Use of an opioid antagonist pursuant to this section shall be considered first aid or emergency treatment for the purpose of any statute relating to liability.”, Defines relevant terms, including “Opioid Overdose Prevention Program,” Opioid antagonist,” “Trainer Overdose, Responder, and “Registered provider.” Permits registered providers to operate an Opioid Overdose Prevention Program if they obtain a certificate of approval from Health Department. (3)  A practitioner acting in good faith and in compliance with the standard of care applicable to that practitioner may directly or by standing order prescribe an opioid antagonist to a person at risk of experiencing an opioid-related overdose or to a registered pain management clinic, family member, friend or other person in a position to assist such person at risk of experiencing an opioid-related overdose. Except as provided in subd. and training, record keeping and reporting. “13-3102. 441.18 of the statutes is created to read: 441.18 Prescriptions for and delivery of opioid antagonists. (c) A prescriber who, acting in good faith with reasonable care, prescribes or does not prescribe an opioid antagonist is not subject to any criminal or civil liability or any professional disciplinary action for: (1)prescribing or failing to prescribe the opioid antagonist; or. (1) In this section: (a) "Administer" has the meaning given in s. 450.01 (1). programs and Trained Overdose Responders. Tit. (2)  He or she acts with reasonable care in administering the drug to the other person. Oct. 1, 2013 Creates an Overdose Response Program overseen by the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. Provides criminal and civil immunity to a person who is permitted by law to prescribe or dispense an opiate antagonist for such prescribing or dispensing, and any outcomes resulting from the eventual administration of the opiate antagonist. Definitions. 2. b. to d., any person may deliver or dispense an opioid antagonist. (c) A pharmacist acting in good faith and in compliance with the standard of care applicable to, pharmacists may dispense opioid antagonists pursuant to a prescription issued in accordance with, (d) A person acting in good faith and with reasonable care to another person whom he or she believes to, be experiencing an opioid related overdose may administer an opioid antagonist that was prescribed, pursuant to subsection (b) of this Code section in accordance with the protocol specified by the, (e) The following individuals are immune from any civil or criminal liability or professional licensing. As used in this section, unless the context otherwise indicates, the following terms, A. The Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services shall evaluate, implement, and report results of such pilot programs to the General Assembly by December 1, 2014.”, A family member, friend, or other person in a position to assist a person experiencing, or likely to experience, an opiate-related overdose, Listing Level Fields - Treatment Programs, Listing Level Fields - Addiction Professionals, Co-Occurring Disorder Treatment Assessment, Listing Level Fields - Recovery Residences, Featured Co-occurring Disorders Treatment Programs. "Unprofessional conduct" does not include providing any of the following: SECTION 8. (1) Title 26, Chapter 55, Emergency Administration of Opiate Antagonist Act, applies to a licensee under, (2) The prescribing or dispensing of an opiate antagonist as defined in Section 26-55-102 by a licensee, under this chapter is not unprofessional or unlawful conduct if the licensee prescribed or dispensed the. 4731.94. Defines “trained, targeted responders.”Must also keep certain records and submit an application for registration before. 5. (a) 2. and ss. (d) “Emergency opioid antagonist” means naloxone hydrochloride or any similarly acting drug that blocks the effects of opioids administered from outside the body and that is approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of an opioid overdose. (III) SHALL NOT BE LIABLE FOR ANY CIVIL DAMAGES FOR ACTS OR MISSIONS RESULTING, (2) RECEIPT OF TRAINING AND INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS THAT, MEET THE CRITERIA OF SUBSECTION (A) AND THE PROMPT SEEKING OF ADDITIONAL, MEDICAL ASSISTANCE SHALL CREATE A REBUTTABLE PRESUMPTION THAT THE PERSON. It does not include intentional administration via the intravenous route. (b)A family member, friend, or other person in a position to assist a person who is apparently experiencing or who is likely to experience an opioid- related overdose. Health Law §, 3309 regarding the “purchase, acquisition, possession or use of an opioid antagonist”to approved. The Department of Health and Human Services may engage in efforts to ascertain and document the number, trends, patterns and risk factors related to fatalities caused by unintentional opioid-related drug overdoses and other drug overdoses. SECTION 19. 1. (a)  Affect any provision of law concerning the confidentiality of medical information. (a) “Administer” or “administration” means to introduce an emergency opioid antagonist into the body of a person. law to prescribe an opiate antagonist, if acting in good faith, may directly or by standing order prescribe, dispense, distribute, or administer an opiate antagonist to a person without being subject to civil liability, or criminal prosecution for the act. (3) Any person or entity may lawfully possess, store, deliver, distribute, or administer an opioid overdose medication pursuant to a prescription or order issued by a practitioner in accordance with this section. (d)An individual who receives an opioid antagonist that was prescribed pursuant to subsection (b) may administer an opioid antagonist to another individual if he or she has a. good faith belief that the other individual is experiencing an opiate-related overdose and he or she exercises reasonable care in administering the opioid antagonist. (a)A person who, acting in good faith and with reasonable care, administers or does not administer an opioid antagonist to another person whom the person believes is suffering an opioid-related drug overdose is not subject to criminal prosecution, sanction under any professional licensing statute, or civil liability, for an act or omission resulting from the administration of or failure to administer the opioid antagonist.